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Crime Science

An Interdisciplinary Journal

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Call for Papers - Cybercrime: interdisciplinary approaches to cutting crime and victimisation in cyber space

Call for Papers - Cybercrime: interdisciplinary approaches to cutting crime and victimisation in cyber spaceThe ubiquitous use of the Internet and smart mobile devices, the wide adoption of cloud-based services, and the advent of the Internet of Things, the Internet of Everything, and the Cyber-Physical Systems, lead to the accepted belief that almost all criminal activities have some cyber elements. A lot of research has been done on cybercrime, but work is often fragmented across specific subject areas. This special issue offers the opportunity to bring together cybercrime researchers from a wider spectrum including crime science and computer science.

This collection will start soon and will release articles on a continuous publishing basis, stay tuned!

Articles

  1. Content type: Research

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    Authors: Aiden Sidebottom, Tienli Kuo, Takemi Mori, Jessica Li and Graham Farrell

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2018

Cybercrime: interdisciplinary approaches to cutting crime and victimisation in cyber space
Edited by Shujun Li, Michael Levi, David Maimon, Kim-Kwang Raymond Choo, Gianluca Stringhini

This special issue is one of the first attempts to bring together cybercrime researchers from different fields by encouraging them to publish papers on cutting cybercrime that can benefit researchers and practitioners from a wider spectrum including crime science and computer science. The ubiquitous use of the Internet and smart mobile devices in people’s everyday lives, the wide adoption of cloud based services and the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT), the Internet of Everything (IoE), and the Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs), lead to the widely accepted belief that almost all criminal activities have some cyber elements. As a consequence, digital forensics (or cyber forensics) have become an essential part of almost all crime investigation processes of law enforcement around the world.

2017

Beyond 'What Works': Advancing Understanding of Crime through Systematic Reviews
Edited by Rob Guerette

Since their origins in the health sciences, systematic reviews and meta-analyses in criminology have largely been focused on the effectiveness of various interventions in preventing crimes and other problem behavior. Yet the strength of systematic reviews also makes them useful for synthesizing and improving our understanding of crime more in general, such as environmental aspects, its patterns, organization, and explanation.

2015

Child Sexual Abuse: Analysis and Intervention
Edited by Dr. Danielle Reynald, Dr. Ella Cockbain

This Crime Science’s first special edition on child sexual abuse brings together leading researchers and practitioners worldwide. It is designed to increase awareness of and interest in theoretical, empirical and practical developments in child protection and the prevention of child sexual abuse. 
Collection published: 30 July 2015

Crime in Developing Countries
Edited by Dr. Mangai Natarajan

It could be argued that many of the most serious crime problems are now to be found in developing countries. Yet these problems have received only scant attention from criminologists and crime scientists, most of who work in developed/Westernized nations. Crime scientists have a special role to play in studying these crimes because their work is oriented to solutions and it is this kind of practical help that the developing world most needs. 
Collection published: 25 July 2015

Crime Patterns in Time and Space: The Dynamics of Crime Opportunities in Urban Areas
Edited by Dr. Andrew Newton, Mr. Marcus Felson

This collection of papers seeks to round out our knowledge of how hotspots and crime patterns shift. This special issue contains papers that examine the dynamic nature of crime patterns, determining whether crime concentrations shift in the course of a day, from weekday to weekend, from school day to non-school day, or even across seasons.
Collection published: 28 April 2015

2014

Innovative Methods in Crime Research
Edited by Dr Jean-Louis van Gelder, Dr Stijn Van Daele

Novel technologies, such as GPS, the Internet and virtual environments are not only rapidly becoming an increasingly influential part of our daily lives, they also have tremendous potential for improving our understanding of where, when and why crime occurs. In addition to these technologies, several innovative research methods, such as neuropsychological measurements and time-space budgets, have emerged in recent years. 
Collection published: 12 August 2014

2013

2013 Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis (ECCA) Symposium
Edited by Prof Jerry Ratcliffe

This special series contains selected papers from the 2013 Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis symposium held in Philadelphia, PA (USA) and hosted by the Center for Security and Crime Science at Temple University.
Collection published: 22 September 2013 

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Article collection: Beyond 'What Works' - Advancing Understanding of Crime through Systematic Reviews

Can systematic reviews and meta-analyses advance our knowledge and synthesis of crime in a broad sense, rather than just assessing the effectiveness of various interventions? This collection includes actual reviews and meta-analyses to this end; comments and thoughts on this question; and empirical manuscripts relevant to the use of systematic reviews as a means to improve knowledge of the environmental aspects of crime as well as its patternsorganization and explanations.
Edited by Rob Guerette, Florida International University

Aims and scope

Crime Science is an international, interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal with an applied focus. The journal's main focus is on research articles and systematic reviews that reflect the growing cooperation among a variety of fields, including environmental criminology, economics, engineering, geography, public health, psychology, statistics and urban planning, on improving the detection, prevention and understanding of crime and disorderCrime Science publishes theoretical articles that are relevant to the field, for example, approaches that integrate theories from different disciplines. The goal of the journal is to broaden the scientific base for the understanding, analysis and control of crime and disorder. It is aimed at researchers, practitioners and policy-makers with an interest in crime reduction. It also publishes short contributions on timely topics including crime patterns, technological advances for detection and prevention, and analytical techniques, and on the crime reduction applications of research from a wide range of fields. 

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Another Crime Science article nominated in the Change the World campaign

The article Domestic burglary drop and the security hypothesis by Tseloni, Farrell, Thompson, Evans and Tilley has been nominated groundbreaking research that could help change the world. Don't miss it!

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2016 Journal Metrics

New Content ItemWe are pleased to announce that Crime Science is indexed in Scopus, the world's largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature.

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